100 Day Project: Week 3

100 Day Project, Projects

Day 15: February 5:

There is no escape from the wind. That was the only inspiring thought as I doodled my way through windswept mountains this morning.

I observe, again, that I don’t work linear. A little on this, a little on that, go back to something else when I’m struck. I think I should adopt this way of working permanently. I am able to just put one piece down that is irritating me until I have a better idea for it.

Wednesday, February 15, 2020 Progress photo. Faber-Castell black ink pen and ceramic stucco texture on paper.

Day 16: February 6

Process shot from Thursday, February 6, 2020. Faber-Castell Black Ink pen, White and Yellow Ochre Acrylic Paint thinned with water, Cotton Thread and Ceramic Stucco Texture.

I had a thought during our very long bumpy drive yesterday about what makes me an artist. Doing art of course, but I also thought about those times in school when you get in trouble and the teacher makes you write a sentence 100 times. There is where I was inspired to begin this day. Write it out over and over “I am an artist.” And then cover it up in art.

But now I am second guessing where I took the piece. Should I have stuck with white? Do I like the yellow ochre? I don’t know. I’ve been considering creating a color palette to work from so my future works look cohesive. A color palette inspired by nature. Will that be too limiting for me? Or is it an element that I need to explore? I noticed that many photographers are changing up the look of their photographs so much they look so different from reality. And there are infinite possibilities to creating a personal brand in artwork with color. This would mean letting go of reality a little more and being flexible in how I approach subjects. It could force me to being more creative with my pieces.

Day 17: February 7

Using hypnotism to trick people into trusting him, so he can come cause chaos.

When the truck is broke down in Death Valley it is all art time. I did a lot more yesterday after checking in. I tried to work on my other project, the polaroid emulsion lifts. One of the lifts went bad and went towards the 100 Day project. By this morning it was dry and I could add line work. I devoted the rest of my day to the dreaded scanning of said polaroid project. Much of that time just to get the technology to work right and then settling in for rhythm of scanning… not done.

Back to that repurposed emulsion lift. It was coming off the plastic in pieces so I decided to use it to see what they looked like over a textured surface, this one being painted fabric. It was a challenge. The paper curled unexpectedly due to being painted on one side and I was trying to place parted out emulsion. THEN the cat walked across the prints I had drying and one of them did a disappearing magic trick. gone to the ether! I still cannot figure it out. I watched it go… but where??? I checked all the paws and between the toes too.

Started to bring this one to life. A failed Polaroid transfer experiment.

Day 18: February 8

Whenever we are done with our chores. And I’m done scanning in the polaroids. I’m thinking about trying out some pieces based on emotional advice like “The Four Agreements.” It isn’t the art I ultimately want to make, but it’s the art I suddenly want to make right now. I’ve been frustrated with how I feel when I lose people. Even if it is just online friendships. I’ve always gotten very sore over rejection from people and I think it maybe time to explore that. When my anxiety was undiagnosed and out of control I had difficulty identifying people’s responses towards me. I found all reactions hostile. So I withdrew and delved into self loathing, where I occasionally visit. Now I am still challenged by social cues. My desire for connection with people often has the effect of repellent. At 37 I’m still trying to understand and navigate social situations. It’s like I was stunted emotionally by social anxiety and I’m just now learning things I should have learned as a child. But as a child I was forced to grow up fast in other ways… but that’s a different subject.

Day 19: February 9

Yesterday’s idea didn’t get past getting four pieces of paper out and labeling them. I’ll let those four agreements simmer.

Today I decided to use the backing of my paper pads because one) I’m running out of paper and two) after last nights podcast about artist Phil Hansen only finding inspiration when being constrained by his materials. I guess I can let go of being so particular about my work surface and having the entire of the 100 Day Project be cohesive just from working on one specific paper surface. Spread your creative wings Taryn.

Starting with a white acrylic base on the cardboard backing.
I wasn’t a fan of that blue. I banish thalo blue!
Seeing what happens if I overlay those bold lines with a mix of acrylic burnt sienna and ceramic stucco texture.

Day 20: February 10

Today I scrounged for surfaces to start three images with a longhorn skull based on a photograph I took in New Mexico. All of them started with same image. We’ll see how they diverge in texture, color and technique.

Day 21: February 11

Today’s gathered insight (source: The Jealous Curator Podcast) making a list of my personal visual vocabulary. Wow. I mean, that’s part of what I’m trying to do here is understand and articulate my motivations! But a list? I love lists. I’m going to have to do this. How incredibly exciting and dull to deconstruct every element of my work. I’m sure they diligently tried to teach this in college, and I, in equal stubborn amounts didn’t absorb the lesson.

Burnt sienna, white and black acrylic thinned with water, Faber-Castell black ink pen. Combining the meditative line making with Raven image.
Week 3 completed Images (I think they are done at least)
Week 3 started/in progress pieces.

My 100 Day “Rules”

  • Use the blog to reflect on the work daily, posting content weekly.
  • Work at a 5 x 7 size on paper
  • Multi-media works
  • Use inspiration from travels, literature, and anywhere else I can.
  • Explore elements I work with already. See where it goes. Reflect on what those elements mean.

Experimenting: Polaroid Photolab and Polaroid Transfers

Art Journal, Medium, process

This was quite the crash course in Polaroid emulsion transfers for me. And I am very much a novice at this juncture, but, I thought it would be fun to share some of the lessons I’ve learned so far.

(First off, we are playing with chemicals so protect your skin and eyes accordingly)

I used:

  • Polaroid Lab
  • iphone
  • soft paint brush
  • one casserole pan: other blogs suggest proper equipment. I like to use St. Vinnies.
  • scissors
  • warm water
  • Strathmore linen finish acrylic paper.

I prepared three polaroids using the Polaroid Lab.
  • Prepare fresh Polaroids.
    • I was finding that even day old prints were harder to work with.
  • There are a lot of editing opportunities to explore prior to printing with the lab. Color correction, adding artifacts, custom filters etc. I found that it was fun to explore the possibilities, but I had to pull myself back. I am an artist and as much fun as all that is, it is mostly unnecessary.
Cutting into the image a little allows the cover sheet to lift off easier.
  • I found that cutting out the image just about as soon as it was done developing allowed the cover sheet to lift off easier.
    • When I used day old Polaroids they were ripping or they were sticking to the cover sheet and the lifting process didn’t go as well
After dropping into warm water. (I am using a clear pan)
  • The emulsion will lift from the backing in warm water.
    • Working with the fresh Polaroid, the emulsion lifts fairly quickly
    • Don’t use boiling water. I made a booger.
    • By the time I got to the third polaroid the lift was near perfect. There does seem to be a correlation between timing and how easy the process goes.
Catching a “wee little ghost” as one of my artist friends described it.
  • Some tutorials say to use two water baths, one hot water and one cold.
    • I found for myself that one tray is enough.
    • I also found that less water is helpful. just enough to cover the paper
A soft brush to help get the emulsion into place
  • I’m using a heavy weight paper made to take acrylic paint. It has a lovely texture to it. And Im using the brush to help move the emulsion around.
  • When you get it where you want you’ll have to learn a technique for yourself to pin it to the paper while lifting it out of the water.
    • A little water reintroduced will lift any problem areas.
One of the final images.